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appointed by john paul ii and benedict xvi. the growth in the catholic church these days is in latin america. is in asia and is in africa. will they go outside europe and possibly choose a pope from one of the other church is growing? that's one of the questions a lot of people are asking today. >> the author of the pew book evangelical catholicism, deep reform in the 21st century church. got a copy here. just hot off the presses. to write this book you deeply reporting and, of course, you have known pope benedict xvi for 23 years since he was cardinal ratzinger. tell us about this process, first of all, the decision which, as you have said and others, this comes from great humility. >> it's a real reflection of the character of the man. this is someone who has never thrust himself into the public eye. he is shy scholar. he is extraordinarily lucid mind, and if he decided in conscience and prayers, as he put it together, that he could not give the church the service the church deserved, then i think we ought to take him on face value at that. in this book evangelical catholicism, i describe
benedict who stepped in and became pope after pope john paul ii, the iconic pope of the 20th century, stepped down. of course, pope john paul ii had been pope since 1979. and so, of course, his impact felt not only in the religious world but also the political world. pope benedict, though, never really, of course, given the chance to emerge from the shadows. and it seems that for a good bit of his time, he was dogged by allegations that came through the child abuse scandal throughout certainly before his reign. he was constantly being dogged by questions regarding that. but mark halperin, an iconic figure replaced by pope benedict who has had a very short tenure and now is stepping down in a way that a lot of popes don't step down before they die. >> short tenure, and it's going to be scrutinized for some of the issues you raised. to me now thinking forward, it's going to be a very big story for catholics and others around the world including the question of will it be another european? there's going to be pressure to look to another region of the country as there was last time. i th
not been the most popular pope. he followed in the footsteps of john paul the ii who was such a global superstar. upon his departure a lot of people are feeling that they didn't really know what they would be missing. they've come to appreciate his cerebral intellect, his kindness, his gentle necessary and we spoke to gregg burke a short while ago, here is what he had to say about today. >> it's sad to see the pope leave saint peters, but on the other hand it's beautiful to see the pope happy and at peace. you can tell he is somebody who has been struggling physically. to think okay i'm not baggy to have all this weight on my shoulders is beautiful. >> gregg of course, one of our colleagues now working at the senior communications adviser for the vatican, very much in tune of what is going on and talked a lot about the serenity the pope is feeling now. there will be a short ceremony with the swiss guards. you may have seen footage of them colorfully dressed. that is the papal protection squad and the pope will board the helicopter to castle gandolfo where he will become pope emeritus a
to meet the pope then john paul the 2nd. then what happened happened and my mother found herself representing bill clinton to the pope. >> how exciting for her. >> it was a challenge. >> i guess it was. >> e.j. this morning quotes somebody who says the most noted earnize i earnizing -- modernizing thing this pope did was to retire, get out of the way. could it be at this modern age a pope just can't afford to be seen frail and weakened in the 24/7 news cycle? are we moving beyond the days? >> i don't think that's necessarily true. john paul felt strongly he wanted the world to see him in a sickened state because that was humanity. that he was setting an example of someone who was frail and feeble and carrying on. i think this pope, you know, has decided to set a different example. we'll see what this precedent means. does it mean future popes have to be pushed out? does he have influence after a new pope is manamed? we're in unchartered waters. >> and in quite a while, we'll see -- >> they have their own camp david. >> with the choicloisted nuns. they'll probably get better food.
on the mission of the papacy. pope benedict is 58 years old. he became pope in 2005 after the death of john paul ii. there is no information as to when a conclave to elect a new pope will begin though it will not happen until after the pope's resignation date. the last pope to resign was way back in the 1200s actually major headline out of rome. pope benedict xvi is resigning. we'll have much more on this coming throughout the morning. >>> talk about our weather now from mississippi to maine. it will be a day of cleaning up after mother nature. the deep south took a direct hit from a tornado on sunday. at the same time, the northeast is still digging out after a blizzard dumped as much as three feet of snow. what a mess up there. and it will still be kind of canadiansy the rest of the week too, right? >> well, potentially. have you to wonder because so far this winter, we have abeen kind of just getting by. >> skirting it. >> it has been very close. you have to wonder when mother nature will deliver one. it looks like a few chances for winter weather later this week. for this morning, just some
he addressed you first but he and benedict would chat when benedict was waiting to see pope john paul. >> completely open. >> reporter: what was he like to talk to? >> very -- he would ask me what my interests were and how i felt and how i saw things. >> reporter: and with a sense of humor, like when benedict offered to sign widmer's copy of a book that he written which was pretty thick. >> when i gave it to him he said, you're really reading this? and i said, i'm trying. he said, it helps to do it in small steps. >> reporter: but he also had a personal crisis as a guard, spending his first christmas away from home. john paul helped him through that. >> i sort of had a meltdown and right at that moment he comes out of his apartment and he noticed and he reached out to me and he thanked me for being there and he gave me courage. >> reporter: what were you doing? were you crying? >> yeah. >> reporter: you were? >> i stopped crying but he in theed my red eyes. >> reporter: as for what's to come, the top job isn't what we think. >> the pope is the end of your life. you have to give up all
of state john kerry. paul ryan is the first republican in the ratings, then marco rubio, jeb bush and speaker boehner. is it a taste of things to come if hillary runs in 2016? >> lefty blogs may be upset at steve doocy. i've seen other things on lefty blogs. i heard that steve doocy actually has calf implants. n now, i don't have any evidence to back that up whatsoever. >> no. >> but, you know, just put a question mark at that. can we put a question mark at the end of that? >> you're referring to, of course, his own personal blog being implanted -- >> sam thought about getting calf implants because we're on a basketball team together. >> that's why he only does television from the waist up. >> exactly. >> just kind of a vanity thing. >> there is a nugget of probably something actually worth discussing here, which is our national obsession with hillary clinton and also the way women are scrutinized in the public lens. >> oh, totally. totally. >> and hillary, in particular, is an incredible sort of sign post for what we'll call the male gaze, given the scrutiny of the way she looks
. we are very grateful for him to part -- for participating. andrew koppelman is the john paul stevens professor of law at northwestern university. he received his bachelor's from the university of chicago and his jd and phd from yale law school. his scholarship focuses on issues at the intersection of law and political philosophy. he is the author of "defending american religious neutrality," and several other books. and more than 80 articles and scholarly journals. sherif girgis is a phd student in philosophy at princeton university and a jd candidate at yale law school. after graduating from princeton , where he won prizes for best senior thesis in ethics and philosophy, as well as the dante society prize, he obtained a degree from the university of oxford as a rhodes scholar. he is the author of a recent book "what is marriage," described as the most formidable defense of traditional marriage ever written. we are grateful to him for participating in this event. >> thank you so much for the introduction. thanks, everyone, for coming. a special thanks to professor koppelman. i have a
. >> steve: sure. peter, the thing is, people really loved pope john paul ii. he really energized people and he was pope for decades. the next pope probably will sit fo well. the church had public relations problems. they need a guy, if not dolan, a charismatic guy like him. >> church. the church has had public relations problems and a lot of the people in the left wing and even main stream media have piled on at this juncture of the catholic church. i see as a time for renewal, excitement. not death clouding a new pope. a new pope being chosen out of many wonderful choices, including my dear friend, cardinal dolan. i don't have a vote, but i know a lot of americans are saying, wow, wouldn't that be a wonderful, wonderful thing? >> steve: that really would be. >> he embraces the world. >> steve: he's a great guy. he's been on the show a couple of times. thank you very much. >> good to see you. >> steve: if you can't pass it through congress, just ram it through congress. the president about to use another executive order. details coming up next. and he dreamed of playing soccer, even tho
. john is right. paul ryan was against it, the president walked away from it, we could not get a bipartisan consensus for a plan that would revitalize the economy, produce growth and create jobs. it is a tragedy. >> i talked to a republican congressman why not vote for sink such and they say because of tax increases but i say you have already raised taxes, they have done that. >> the real answer they will not put the country first. how do we grow our economy? this washington game is all about their power and position and why the congress has 11 percent rating together. >> gentleman, all love to talk to you about what is going on in our country. can you get more from the political insiders every monday at 10:30 a.m. eastern and they will be back here next sunday, you can also follow them on twitter at "insiders." >>heather: a consume group is pushing the f.d.a. to put the squeeze on how much sugar goes into your favorite soft drink but is government regulation the answer? hi. hi. i'm here to pick up some cacti. it should be under stephens. the verizon share everything plan for s
to serve. he was an inspirational focus point for people like paul and i. we were kids, young men and women when president reagan piqued our interest. >> a lot of people think john boehner will retire in 2014. do you think paul ryan would be a good speaker of the house? >> he would be an exceptional leader, whatever he might be. paul ryan does great things. >> i am getting the hook. scott walker, thank you for being here. [applause] >> you will tag team out with a bill right now. notice to sue proved quick burst to see you. -- nice to see you. >> nice to see you. we are here in washington, governor sam brownback from kansas who is trying to make the trek from topeka. the weather has slowed him down. we will finish with you, governor. >> they have 10 inches of snow that had them. >> he has an excused absence. we will finish with you today. thank you for joining us. i have been talking to the other governors, the same issue. the federal impact of the states and what is happening in the states. heading towards march 1 is the sequester, automatic edger cuts will go into effect. you have fort ca
view her favorable. president obama second at 51%. paul ryan, marco rubio, john boehner, all far behind. joining me now karen tumulte and david goodfriend. thank you for joining me. the analysis of the seven-point dive there, if that's the accurate word here, why do you believe the approval rating is sinking from december? >> a couple of things. in december, we just come off the large presidential election where both he and his republican opponents spent inordinate amounts of money to get the point across and people weigh the two messages. mitt romney versus barack obama and now left with sort of a generic feeling of the public how do you think things are going? as you put on the screen, most americans don't feel things are going well and will blame that on an incumbent. that having been said, the president's approval ratings are still strong as you point out, strong relative to congress and historical trends. i happen to think that the biggest news out of that poll is even after the republicans tried to tar her with benghazi, hillary clinton remains unbelievably strong and i think that
championed it. it was john boehner and company and paul ryan of the so-called budget hawks. they made it so disastrous that they thought nobody could ever, ever, ever go along with this. now they reversed themselves and say let's do it. i think the american people know whose fingerprints are all over this baby. i just hope that they come to their senses beforehand and it doesn't happen. there is other stuff in the news. when we come back, jesse jackson jr. and his wife both on trial here in washington, d.c. yesterday, lynn sweet who knows chicago politics and has covered chicago politics better than anybody else alive joins us in the next segment. she was in the courthouse yesterday. she talked to congressman jackson. she'll tell us all about it. >> announcer: on your radio and on current tv, this is the "bill press show." agenda, actually supporting one party or the other. when the democrats are wrong, they know that i'm going to be the first one to call them out. they can question whether i'm right, but i think that the audience gets that this guy, to the best of his ability, is trying
unless they got cuts, there would have lost that the raid at the end. big loss that debate. john boehner and paul rand did a great job together. you cannot govern from that office, you but you have to be very careful about high-profile last-minute negotiations. i've worked in the white house and three administrations. the president has a tremendous institutional advantage in these kinds of fights. what republicans have to do is avoid these fights, the straps that they are laying. provide an alternative through passing legislation, just to show this is how they would govern if they had the powers of the presidency and the senate. and be careful. there are some rough edges. host: some are not strategy as far as moving the debt ceiling ahead. guest: if they had gone ahead with it, it would have been politically cataclysmic. it was the worst percival -- worst possible ground to make their point. president obama 1. i think it's absolutely crucial for the future of the country that you cannot govern from the house. some house republicans, i am sympathetic to their concerns. their enthusiasm tr
into another recession. if you ask republican senator rand paul, this crisis, it's a pittance. it's just really nibbling at the edges. no big deal. republican house speaker john boehner says this crisis threatens national security. republican congressman tom cole says fiscal questions trump defense. i can totally see how they are going to win the message war on this thing, right? they just have to pick one of their seven messages on it before deciding to award the points here. how this particular crisis is fought over to some people i'm sure is politically fascinating. to most of the country, though, it is unfascinating. it is not fascinating at all. it seems like the inarguably important and interesting thing here is that we keep doing this. this is how we govern now. between president obama and the republican-led house of representatives, this is how the united states government works now. we're not lurching from crisis to crisis because crises keep arising naturally in the world and we have to respond to them, we're lurching from crisis to crisis to crisis to crisis because we keep creating
for the people he elected to serve. he was an inspirational focus point for people like paul and i. we were kids, young men and women when president reagan piqued our interest. >> a lot of people think john boehner will retire in 2014. do you think paul ryan would be a good speaker of the house? >> he would be an exceptional leader, whatever he might be. paul ryan does great things. >> i am getting the hook. scott walker, thank you for being here. [applause] >> you will tag team out with a bill right now. notice to sue proved quick burst to see you. -- nice to see you. >> nice to see you. we are here in washington, governor sam brownback from kansas who is trying to make the trek from topeka. the weather has slowed him down. we will finish with you, governor. >> they have 10 inches of snow that had them. >> he has an excused absence. we will finish with you today. thank you for joining us. i have been talking to the other governors, the same issue. the federal impact of the states and what is happening in the states. heading towards march 1 is the sequester, automatic edger cuts will go into eff
at entitlements and make tough decisions. >> that me share with you reporting of paul west's -- paul west. there are about 15 republican governors saying no to this expansion. there was a push to get all republican governors to oppose it. rush limbaugh says john kasich is up for reelection and he is changing with the people of this state are. he is reading the tea leaves. the president carried ohio. death ohio is the -- guest: ohio is the epicenter of these elections. i served with john kasich. he has correctly determined that the medicaid expansion program is the best way to deal with ohio's uninsured. host: steve latourette suggesting the revenue is still on the table. do you think we need to reform the tax code to raise more money? guest: absolutely. when speaker boehner was talking to the president, he put $800 billion of revenue on the table. the conservative republicans said, you are talking about raising taxes. the speaker was talking about that, if you simplify the tax code and take away some of the gimmicks, deductions, safe harbors, you can raise $800 billion or $1 trillion over
too. in some ways that complicates eric cantor's task. paul ryan is his friend. marco rubio, they have ambitions as well. it's hard. whether it's internally or externally thinking about the presidency. >> you make a great historic point about governors. thanks so much. john king reporting. >>> we're just getting in some new information from the nfl about that power outage that disrupted the super bowl for more than half an hour. brian todd is in new orleans. he's working the story. what are you picking up, brian? >> reporter: wolf, just got word from the nfl and from one of the managers of the superdome that there were at least power fluctuations during beyonce's rehearsal in the week leading up to the super bowl. this statements fleeds part, during rehearsals there were some fluctuations in the frequency of the power supply but not in the amount of the power supply to the building. frequency of -- frequency fluctuations can present problems for sensitive technology including high definition television cameras. there were no power outages at the rehearsal. that was from the nfl talking
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)

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